Date: 2nd September 2010 at 10:44am
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Paul Morgan has been one of the best lower league central defenders ever since Preston were foolish enough to let him drop through the net. He would go on to become a rock at Lincoln, be blighted by injury at Bury and then agree to an Indian summer or two at the Silkmen.

Currently studying for a degree in Physiotherapy at Salford University, Simmo has managed to talk him, knackered knees and all (and Morgs should know from his coursework) into one last season with the Silkman. Thus far Captain Morgan, though never a rum one, has been a dependable and commendable leader at the heart of the defence alongside free scoring centre back Nat Brown. Nat Brown goal machine – joint leading scorer indeed!Whilst Nat is using his head Paul is clearly continuing to do the first five yards in his head.


Morgan has a long standing relationship with gaffer Gary, and of course the late great KA. Indeed the relationship is predated only by his association with Lincoln and Grimsby manager Alan Buckley. For it was Buckley`s words and proven track record with young stars that tempted Mark Thomas Morgan (Paul is a middle name that he prefers for personal reasons) to go to Lincoln. Preston had dithered, due in part to injury concerns, before offering the talented Northern Ireland squad member a years extension. Were it not for a troublesome knee the one Northern Ireland cap and Championship career at least looked on the cards.


Morgan lived through the administration at Sincil Bank and came out the other end with Keith Alexander and Gary Simpson joining to create something of a golden era. You`ll never beat Paul Morgan` rang around Sincil Bank as the Captain and sweeper did the business in a back 5 that saw 4 playoff positions including two final failures. Nothing last forever in the lower Leagues, things or rather people inevitably move on. Paul struggled in a rather exposed back four, as Schofield and Deehan`s flowing football capitulated to ‘route one` as the bruisers cruised through every week.


When Keith ended up as Director of Football at Bury overseeing young Chris Casper, Morgan happily made the move; as he and the Imps concluded his contract cancellation by mutual consent. Things seamed to dovetail perfectly, with an opportunity to return to his native North West coupled with Paul`s wife taking up a promotion in the area. Nothing last forever in the lower Leagues as KA left six months later. Paul struggled with injuries before Keith again took a chance and signed him, initially on a one year loan, for the Silkmen.

A bedrock of the defence in 2008/9 he was pivotal in us surviving the perennial struggle and joined on a one year deal in July 2009. Simmo rates Morgs highly and with due cause as he clearly realises the player sees things early. Who needs pace and power if you can do the first few yards in your head. Even Jose Veigas reactions can’t beat that. Paul will be invaluable again this season. His leadership qualities combined with positional sense, timing in the tackle and experience will always make up for any fears over .

Though the saying you`ll never beat Paul Morgan may not be as true today in a 4 man defence as it was all those years ago in a five; you know you can rely on Morgan to always play the consummate Captain`s game.


Paul Mark Thomas Morgan
Number 6
D.O.B. 23 Oct 1978
Birthplace Belfast, Northern Ireland
Height 6’0
Weight 11st 3lbs
Position Centre Half Sweeper
Signed July 2008
Fee Free
Contracted to June 2011
Former Clubs Preston, Bury, Lincoln City

International Northern Ireland


2010/11
Aps 3 L2 1 (+1) JPT-1
fouls 2 Fouled 3
Yellows 1
Mins on pitch 224

1997-2001 Preston 0 (0)
1997-1998 → Sligo Rovers (loan) 0 (0)
2001-2007 Lincoln City 212 (2)
2007-2009 Bury 20 (0)
2008-2009 → Macclesfield Town (loan) 39 (0)
2009- Macclesfield Town 36 (0)

International
1998 Northern Ireland U21 1 (0)

 

One Reply to “Captain Morgan’s Indian Voyage”

  • A quality player who does the first yard in his head, his forebodings over the midfield motorway at the Imps proved correct, that alone cost Schofield’s Imps well deserved glory.

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